Slide presentation of the webinar held on 7 February 2019. Within the growing literature on ‘shock responsive social protection’, the potential role played by social assistance data and information systems (e.g. social registries and beyond) is often discussed.

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This paper updates the Social Risk Management (SRM) conceptual framework; the foundation of the World Bank’s first Social Protection Sector Strategy. SRM 2.0 addresses the increasingly risky and uncertain world; with opportunities and outcomes driven by possible disruptions from technology, markets, climate change, etc. SRM 2.0 is a spatial assets and livelihoods approach to household well-being featuring a risk chain covering all households across the lifecycle and for both positive and negative events. Key findings: Location and context are critical for household choice

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This briefing note summarises technical assistance in Mauritania. This focuses on Mauritania’s Social Registry, designed to support targeting of long-term social protection programmes, and assessed the feasibility of using this for targeting seasonal programmes (including humanitarian interventions) that are responding to shocks contributing to food insecurity.

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An ECHO-funded technical assistance facility, managed by the World Food Programme (WFP), aimed to explore how social protection systems can be strengthened in fragile and forced displacement contexts, with a view to contributing to the global learning agenda on when and how these can be used to address humanitarian needs in a more cost-effective, efficient and predictable way. This briefing note summarises technical assistance in Mali.

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Adaptive and Shock Responsive Social Protection in the Caribbean: Putting People at the Centre of Resilience and Response

The use of social protection tools and mechanisms in fragile and conflict-affected contexts has been growing in scale and relevance. Despite the existence of extensive analysis indicating the positive impacts of social protection on human well-being, major knowledge gaps remain when considering the extent of these effects in humanitarian settings. In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), where large-scale conflicts have left millions of families and children in need of humanitarian assistance, the demand for evidence-oriented policy and programming is even higher.

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This article analyses the role of social protection programmes in contributing to people's resilience to climate risks. Drawing from desk‐based and empirical studies in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda, it finds that social transfers make a strong contribution to the capacity of individuals and households to absorb the negative impacts of climate‐related shocks and stresses. They do so through the provision of reliable, national social safety net systems—even when these are not specifically designed to address climate risks.

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As part of the ASEAN–UN Joint Strategic Plan for Disaster Management 2016–2020, FAO, UNICEF, ILO, WFP and UNISDR implemented a joint project, funded by the European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO), entitled 'Strengthening the capacity of AMS to develop risk-informed and shock-responsive social protection for resilience’.

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While there are recent international experiences successfully using social assistance data, they are not widespread – and have sometimes encountered challenges. For example, focusing on shock response: Vertical expansions and programmes "piggybacking" on beneficiary data require very little additional efforts (e.g. in terms of adapting processes) and can therefore enable timely responses, if adequately planned in advance. However, they present significant drawbacks in terms of the coverage of affected populations, which need explicit addressing.

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In a context of increasing frequency, size and duration of disasters and crises globally, the limitations of standard approaches to humanitarian response have come to the forefront, causing governments and international agencies to pledge to “use existing resources and capabilities better to shrink humanitarian needs over the long term” (Grand Bargain, 2016). The social protection sector can have an important role to play in this process, as recent research on “Shock Responsive Social Protection” has confirmed (O’Brien et al., 2018, Beazley et al. forthcoming).

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