The Legacy Maternal and Child Cash Transfer (MCCT) was funded by the Livelihoods and Food Security Fund from January 2016 to April 2019. The MCCT aimed to improve nutrition outcomes for mothers and children through the delivery of nutrition-sensitive cash transfers to pregnant women during the First 1,000 days. Briefing paper that summarises the findings of an experimental evaluation of the programme in three townships in Myanmar's dry zone.

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This document summarises Save the Children's involvement in supporting the Government of Myanmar and other partners to test and roll out a "First 1000 days" Maternal and Child Grant Programme that has proven to prevent chronic malnutrition. It also explains what this means in terms of coverage of children and what nationwide coverage of such a scheme would mean.

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Linking social protection, agriculture and food security and nutrition: diversifying production and diets

Social protection is an important way of reducing inequality and mitigating the impacts of disasters, and it is expanding in the region. A special section of this report discusses how to develop social protection programmes that accelerate progress in eradicating hunger and malnutrition.

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As Bhutan has progressed financially, its health indicators have also progressed. It has achieved significant gains in all the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Yet two major indicators of significant undernutrition remain persistently elevated: stunting of children younger than 5, and anemia in women and children.

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This paper examines promising approaches from a wide array of literatures to improve gender-inclusive nutrition interventions in South Asia. It is the second of a series on gender and nutrition in South Asia. The present study drew from the conceptual framework of the previous paper and investigated four types of innovations in nutrition initiatives that address gender.

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The Social Protection Pathways to Nutrition: Evidence in Asia and the Pacific

Evaluations of social protection interventions across Africa often register significant success in improving household food security indicators, but little or no improvement in individual nutritional outcomes. One reason is the under-coverage of poor people; another is the low value of social transfers. This paper reviews experiences with social protection in six African countries – Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. Social protection programmes are expanding and becoming institutionalised in all six countries.

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Countries’ interest in investing in social protection is growing – in part as a result of scientific recognition of its effectiveness for poverty reduction and food and nutrition security, for human productivity, and for investment in agricultural and off-farm production. Social protection instruments can ensure adequate food for all and enable even the poorest and most vulnerable segments of the population to acquire the essentials.

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