Last updated: 24/3/2022

Basic Information

Country
Geographic area

Programme Details

Programme objectives

To achieve food security and counteract the debilitating effects of the economic sanctions imposed on Iraq in 1990, by providing families with basic food items 

References
Alzobaidee, H.L.K. 2015. Social Protection and Safety Nets in Iraq. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies. Accessed 26 May 2017. <http://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/SocialprotectionandsafetynetsinIraq.pdf>.
Start date
1990
References
World Bank. 2007. Considering the Future of the Iraqi Public Distribution System. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 27 May 2017. <https://goo.gl/RK1vcY>.
Previous programme name (if any)
Iraq Public Distribution System (PDS)
Coverage
In 2016, 90 per cent of Iraqi households (33 million people) received subsidised food commodities, while the programme’s expenditure was reported to be 0.6 per cent of GDP
References
IMF. 2015. “Iraq: Selected Issues.” IMF Country Report, no. 17/252. Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund. Accessed 26 May 2017. <https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=43199.0>.
Programme expenditure
IQD3.213 trillion; 3.2 per cent of government spending in 2017; Source of funding: Government
References
UNICEF Iraq. 2017. Personal communication.

Targeting and eligiblity

Targeting methods
Means Test
References
World Bank. 2007. Considering the Future of the Iraqi Public Distribution System. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 27 May 2017. <https://goo.gl/RK1vcY>.
Targeted areas
Nationwide
Target groups
All except high-income households
References
UNICEF Iraq. 2017. Personal communication.
Eligibility criteria
The entire population of Iraq used to be eligible for a nominal fee (equivalent to USD0.16 per person per month), but since 2016, people with income higher than USD1,100 and government employees who are Director-Generals or above have not received PDS
References
World Bank. 2007. Considering the Future of the Iraqi Public Distribution System. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 27 May 2017. <https://goo.gl/RK1vcY>. UNICEF Iraq. 2017. Personal communication.

Coverage and other information

Type of benefits
Provision of essential food products
References
Alzobaidee, H.L.K. 2015. Social Protection and Safety Nets in Iraq. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies. Accessed 26 May 2017. <http://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/SocialprotectionandsafetynetsinIraq.pdf>.
Amount of benefits
A basket of 10 products providing 100 per cent of the minimum daily caloric requirement: wheat flour (9 kg/card/person/month), rice (3 kg), sugar (2 kg), vegetable oil (1 litre) and children’s milk (3 packs of 450 g each)
References
World Bank. 2007. Considering the Future of the Iraqi Public Distribution System. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 27 May 2017. <https://goo.gl/RK1vcY>. IMF. 2015. “Iraq: Selected Issues.” IMF Country Report, no. 17/252. Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund. Accessed 26 May 2017. <https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=43199.0>.
Payment/delivery frequency
Monthly; due to the country’s economic downturn and conflict, the distribution has been disrupted and was delivered quarterly in 2017
References
UNICEF Iraq. 2017. Personal communication.
Benefit delivery mechanism
In-kind
Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frequency
Survey of the social and economic status of families in Iraq; 2012 Household Socio-economic Survey; MIS: Tracking system
References
Alzobaidee, H.L.K. 2015. Social Protection and Safety Nets in Iraq. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies. Accessed 26 May 2017. <http://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/SocialprotectionandsafetynetsinIraq.pdf>. UNICEF Iraq. 2017. Personal communication.