develop_region: 
Middle East & North Africa
iso2: 
YE
iso3: 
YEM
Continent: 
Asia
Official name: 
Republic of Yemen

The trend for conducting rigorous impact evaluations of development interventions has prompted many researchers to start looking more closely at public works programmes (PWPs). This study identifies design and implementation features that contribute to programme success or failure, highlighting which PWP model is appropriate in what context and why linkages to broader graduation strategies and other interventions are important.

English

Social Protection in the Middle East and North Africa region (MENA)

This Online Community (OC) is part of the project "Social Protection Knowledge Generation and Policy Analysis in MENA", a partnership between the International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth (IPC-IG) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Middle...

Illness-related costs for patients with tuberculosis (TB) ≥20% of pre-illness annual household income predict adverse treatment outcomes and have been termed “catastrophic". Social protection initiatives, including cash transfers, are endorsed to help prevent catastrophic costs.

English

The productive impacts of transfer programmes have been receiving increased attention. However, little is known about such effects in emergency and crisis settings. Even less is known about whether transfer type – a food basket or a cash grant – influences the productive potential of such transfers. Theory suggests that cash transfers can relieve liquidity constraints associated with investments, but subsidised food provision, by acting as a form of insurance, may prevent households from retreating to conservative income-generating strategies during volatile periods.

English

Weekly Social Protection Links: December 13

Yemen’s children are growing up in the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. UNICEF is on the ground, working with partners to provide health care, nutrition, safe water, education and more. After nearly five years of conflict, Yemen has become the world's largest humanitarian crisis. Eighty percent of Yemen's population — 24 million people — are living in poverty and deprivation, with more than 12 million children in dire need of humanitarian assistance.

English

On 15 October 2019, UNESCO opened a Project’ Office in Sana’a as part of its ongoing efforts to preserve and safeguard conflict-affected heritage sites in Yemen. The office, which is hosted by UNOPS, allows UNESCO to closely follow the implementation of the project activities in the four historic cities, consisting of physical rehabilitation interventions, capacity building of cultural heritage stakeholders, technical assistance for the design of urban rehabilitation plans as well as small grants to artists and CSOs in order to support cultural programming and services.

English

In 2017, in response to the one of the world’s worst manmade crises, a consortium of CARE and Action Contre la Faim (ACF) implemented a European Union (EU)-funded Multi-Purpose Cash (MPC) project in the Abyan and Amran governorates of Yemen. The project aimed to enhance food security and to support livelihood activities, savings groups, and the resilience of communities with the rehabilitation of critical, community-identified shared assets. This report is a summary of findings from the full evaluation.

English

Since 2015, conflict in Yemen has killed and injured civilians, restricted access to basic necessities, and deprived vulnerable Yemenis of the means to support themselves. In December 2018, the UN estimated that more than 24 million people—80 percent of the population—were in need of humanitarian assistance.

English

As Yemen approaches more than 4 years of war, an estimated 20 million people are in need of access to healthcare. Through the generous support of the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), WHO has been able to meet health needs in the midst of this evolving conflict.

English