develop_region: 
Unknown
iso2: 
SE
iso3: 
SWE
Continent: 
Europe
Official name: 
Kingdom of Sweden

OPINION: New parents are given 240 days off between them – but corporate pressure means it’s men who then return to work. Born and raised in Sweden by Polish migrants, I was always taught to cherish and appreciate Sweden’s welfare system. It was something to be proud of when looking outward to the rest of the world. Just as Swedish, however, is the traditional family unit.

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While everybody is focused on the baby after it's born, mothers are acutely at risk. Worldwide, 17.7% of new mothers experience postpartum depression.

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This paper is centered on the complementary roles played by pension communication/information and financial literacy for a sustainable and equitable nonfinancial defined contribution (NDC) system at both the micro and macro socioeconomic level.

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This paper analyzes old-age incomes in Sweden from a pension policy perspective, focusing on both the economic position of elderly citizens and the redistributive effects of the pension system’s different parts. The empirical analyses show that each subsequent cohort that reaches retirement age faces higher relative poverty risks than previous cohorts.

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Sweden’s gender pension gap is about 33 percent at retirement, reflecting the gender earnings gap – itself a reflection of a structural gender difference in low-pay jobs for women and men and career advancement opportunities. The individual nonfinancial defined contribution (NDC) account data examined show that the allocation of time to informal care work in the home versus formal market work is the main determinant of the gaps.

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The paper focuses on the interrupted careers in four countries where pensions are based on lifetime labor income, but they have different labor market patterns. High levels of employment in Germany and Sweden are in contrast with low levels of employment, particularly for women, in Italy and Poland. Career interruptions of women in Italy mean early withdrawal from the labor market, while in Sweden women choose part-time employment. Lower employment rates and gender pay gaps are important causes of differences in expected pension levels.

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This paper explores trends and drivers behind the gender gap in pensions (GGP) in Europe, focusing on countries with notionally defined contribution (NDC) schemes: Italy, Latvia, Norway, Poland, and Sweden. Based on current gender gaps on the labor market, the paper relates the progressivity of pension systems and the coverage of child care related spells to the GGP. It shows that NDC countries do not stand out as a group compared to other European countries in terms of pension outcomes for women. Nevertheless, NDC countries differ significantly from one another.

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It is desirable that pension reforms and legislated rules have the backing of the population or at least are accepted by voters. With the objective of achieving “acceptance,” the Swedish Pensions Agency publishes an annual actuarial balance of the solvency of the whole public pension system and distributes to each participant information on his or her individual accumulated notional balance and funded accounts, movements during the year, and estimates of the projected individual future pension amount.

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Sweden’s reform began with a published sketch in 1992, and developed into nonfinancial defined contribution (NDC) legislation in 1994. This paper discusses the underpinnings of the Swedish NDC scheme’s financial stability, factors influencing the adequacy of benefits, and its interplay with other components of the pension system: the public financial defined contribution scheme, the minimum pension guarantee, and the occupational schemes. The paper also includes information on the December 2017 broad six-party political agreement on forthcoming legislation.

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The Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), Arbetsförmedlingen (the Swedish Public Employment Service) and the Economic Policy Research Institute (EPRI) hereby invite and welcome you to nominate candidates for this International Training Programme on Social Protection for Sustainable Development. Trusting that this training programme will contribute to the development of the social protection system in your country, we would like to invite your institution to nominate qualified candidates for participation in the programme.

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