develop_region: 
Unknown
iso2: 
JP
iso3: 
JPN
Continent: 
Asia
Official name: 
Japan

The government is coordinating to provide ¥200,000 in cash per household as a measure for families and others facing income loss due to the spread of the new coronavirus, according to sources.

The government is considering implementing the measure on a self-reporting basis, with the cash being paid after applicants report the amount they earn and their income loss from the virus epidemic, the sources said

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OPINION: The benefits of paternity leave are well-documented. When fathers equally share the duties of rearing newborns with mothers, family bonds are strengthened and all involved are healthier and happier. That, in turn, flows through to society and the economy, bridging gender and pay gaps and for nations with fast ageing populations, providing the conditions to boost flagging birth rates. But laws mandating time off work and incentives are not enough; there also has to be wide societal and cultural acceptance.

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BLOG: In South Korea, the number of men taking paternity leave jumped from 1,402 in 2011 to 22,297 in 2019, when the maximum length increased from one year to two years as a household with two working parents are able to take one-year respective breaks from work to stay at home with children under the age of eight.  A "paternity leave bonus" also allows the second parent taking leave to receive a maximum of 2.5 million Korean won in the first three months of the leave.

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BLOG: At first glance, life seems to be getting better for Japanese women. In an economy that has historically lagged other developed nations in female workforce participation, a record 71% are now employed, an 11 point leap over a decade ago. The Japanese government boasts one of the world’s most generous parental leave laws, and recently created a “limited full-time worker” category aimed primarily at mothers looking to balance job and family. But even with these advantages, Japanese women — single or married, full-time or part-time — face a difficult financial future.

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The labor ministry plans to urge companies from April 2021 to ensure jobs are available for workers until the age of 70, it was learned Wednesday. The ministry will also require large companies with over 300 workers to publish the number of mid-career hires on their overall payrolls.

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Caring for Japan’s elderly: Youth under pressure

BLOG: Life in Japan is good. You live in a relatively new, well-maintained apartment (flatteringly, if disingenuously, called a “mansion” in Japanese) conveniently located close to the train that shuttles you to work in the city each weekday. When you first moved here to take on a new role with a Japanese company, this foreign land was exotic, unusual, exciting and — at times — maybe a little bit difficult. But you’ve settled in. Adapted.

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The government has drawn up a three-year plan to support people now in their thirties and forties who missed out on regular employment when companies slashed hiring after the economic bubble burst. The goal is to get 300,000 people in this age group into regular, full-time jobs. The author argues that this approach is too broad-based and that more attention should be paid to individual circumstances.

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OPINION: The reckless depletion of our planet’s resources is a clear-cut violation of the intergenerational contract. If we continue down this path, there is no moral reason why our children should be expected to pay for our retirement.

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(OPINION): In Japan, which faces an accelerated aging of the population with ever fewer births, a vague sense of anxiety over the public pension system is spreading. Generally speaking, future pension finance greatly fluctuates depending on demographic composition and changes in socio-economic conditions. Accordingly, the government examines the health of pension finance every five years to assess its condition.

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