Programme objectives

To alleviate the negative impacts of the removal of subsidies and financially support families living in poverty by transferring cash to individuals in certain social and economic groups 

Legal Framework: Law no. 31 of 1996

Note: The programme was discontinued due to the conflict and a lack of funds (including the suspension of donor funds) in 2015. The suspension has left 8–9 million people without social protection support, but the interruption of civil servants’ salary payments prevented international donors from continuing to support the financial transfers through the SWF. In May 2017 the World Bank and UNICEF launched the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project Second Additional Financing (AF2) using the database of SWF beneficiary households to target assistance. Information provided in this profile refers to programme design features and characteristics as they were before its disruption in 2015.

References
World Bank. 2017. International Development Association Project Paper on a Proposed Second Additional Financing and Restructuring in the Amount of SDR 145.9 million (US$200 million equivalent) to the United Nations Children’s Fund for the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project. Report No: PAD2402. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/682921495418453668/pdf/RY-ECRP-AF2-Project-Paper-5-8-17-05122017.pdf>. IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Country
Geographic area
Previous programme name (if any)
 
Start date
1996
References
World Bank. 2017. International Development Association Project Paper on a Proposed Second Additional Financing and Restructuring in the Amount of SDR 145.9 million (US$200 million equivalent) to the United Nations Children’s Fund for the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project. Report No: PAD2402. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/682921495418453668/pdf/RY-ECRP-AF2-Project-Paper-5-8-17-05122017.pdf>.
Programme components
Conditionalities (if any)
 
Contribution type and amount
 
Targeting methods
Proxy Means Test
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Targeted areas
Nationwide
References
World Bank. 2017. International Development Association Project Paper on a Proposed Second Additional Financing and Restructuring in the Amount of SDR 145.9 million (US$200 million equivalent) to the United Nations Children’s Fund for the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project. Report No: PAD2402. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/682921495418453668/pdf/RY-ECRP-AF2-Project-Paper-5-8-17-05122017.pdf>.
Target groups
Families/individuals living in poverty; people with disabilities; orphans; elderly people; women without a breadwinner; unemployed people without income.
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Eligibility criteria
Social category: people with disabilities (full and permanent; partial and permanent; full or partial and temporary; the common condition is that the person is unable to work either permanently or temporarily due to disability or chronic illness; those with a partial permanent disability, for instance, include those suffering from chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, tuberculosis, heart disease, kidney failure, rheumatism, cancer, AIDS, hepatitis, anaemia and several psychological disorders); orphans (under 18 years old whose parents are either dead or who have disappeared; also for those aged 18–25 years if they are enrolled in college or technical education); elderly people (above age 55 for women and 60 for men) Economic category: women without a breadwinner in the household (single, widowed or divorced women not remarried) whose breadwinner is absent for any reason and does not support them; they need to be above age 18, unless they are widowed or divorced with at least one child; unemployed (a man who does not have a public or private job and/or whose income/earnings are below the level of the SWF cash assistance; the potential beneficiaries must be between 18 and 60 years old) The legal conditions that apply to any applicant to the SWF programme are: (i) the individual or his/her family has no source of income (either from property, business or work) that might compensate for the lack of government assistance; and (ii) the individual or his/her family has no relative legally obliged to support him/her financially
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Eligibility reassessment (if any)
After the 2008 Comprehensive Social Survey (CSS), individuals meeting the economic criteria should have their information updated on the CSS database every two years, while individuals meeting the social criteria should have their information updated on the database every five years
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Type of benefits
Cash
References
Azaki, A. 2015. Social Protection and Safety Nets in Yemen. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/ SocialprotectionandsafetynetsinYemen.pdf>.
Amount of benefits
The amount varied between YER3,000 and YER6,000 per household depending on household size: one person YER3,000; two people YER3,600; three people YER4,200; four people YER4,800; five people YER5,400; more than five people YER6,000; the average amount paid per family was YER5,000; the World Bank Additional Financing Project (AF2) maintains the average amount of YER5,000
References
World Bank. 2017. International Development Association Project Paper on a Proposed Second Additional Financing and Restructuring in the Amount of SDR 145.9 million (US$200 million equivalent) to the United Nations Children’s Fund for the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project. Report No: PAD2402. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/682921495418453668/pdf/RY-ECRP-AF2-Project-Paper-5-8-17-05122017.pdf>
Payment/delivery frequency
Quarterly
References
World Bank. 2017. International Development Association Project Paper on a Proposed Second Additional Financing and Restructuring in the Amount of SDR 145.9 million (US$200 million equivalent) to the United Nations Children’s Fund for the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project. Report No: PAD2402. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/682921495418453668/pdf/RY-ECRP-AF2-Project-Paper-5-8-17-05122017.pdf>.
Benefit delivery mechanism
Delivered through post offices and cashiers, and a smaller number through banks
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Benefit recipients
Individuals within a poor household meeting the programme criteria
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Minimum and maximum duration of benefits (if any)
In principle, before 2015, SWF benefits should last for two years for beneficiaries who met the economic criteria, and for five years for beneficiaries who met the social criteria (or the period defined at enrolment)
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.
Coverage
In 2013, 1.5 million families and over 8 million individuals; 35 per cent of the population lived in a household with at least one beneficiary, of which: 2.6 per cent with a permanent full disability; 7.6 per cent with a permanent partial disability; 0.4 per cent with a temporary full/partial disability; 3.8 per cent orphans; 34.6 per cent elderly; 23.5 per cent women without a breadwinner; 27.6 per cent unemployed 4.25 million children under 18 years (57 per cent of the individuals within SWF beneficiary households); 7,235 orphans in 2013 ; in 2012: 389,024 child beneficiaries and 47,538 orphans
References
World Bank. 2017. International Development Association Project Paper on a Proposed Second Additional Financing and Restructuring in the Amount of SDR 145.9 million (US$200 million equivalent) to the United Nations Children’s Fund for the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project. Report No: PAD2402. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/682921495418453668/pdf/RY-ECRP-AF2-Project-Paper-5-8-17-05122017.pdf>. IPC-IG and UNICEF,. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>. UNICEF and MoPIC. 2015. Child Budget Analysis 2015. Sana’a: United Nations Children’s Fund and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 13 September 2017. <https://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/files/CBA_Eng_ rev8_for_printing_final_2_2_2015.pdf>.
Programme expenditure
SWF budget for social assistance in 2014: USD287.6 million. Source of funding: Since its inception in 1996, the cash transfer programme has been funded by the Government of Yemen, with partial financial support from the World Bank, the European Union and the USA
References
World Bank. 2017. International Development Association Project Paper on a Proposed Second Additional Financing and Restructuring in the Amount of SDR 145.9 million (US$200 million equivalent) to the United Nations Children’s Fund for the Yemen Emergency Crisis Response Project. Report No: PAD2402. Washington, DC: World Bank. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/682921495418453668/pdf/RY-ECRP-AF2-Project-Paper-5-8-17-05122017.pdf>. Azaki, A. 2015. Social Protection and Safety Nets in Yemen. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/ SocialprotectionandsafetynetsinYemen.pdf>.
Institutions and agencies involved
Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs; World Bank; UNICEF; WFP; Arab Fund for Development
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>. Azaki, A. 2015. Social Protection and Safety Nets in Yemen. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ids.ac.uk/files/dmfile/ SocialprotectionandsafetynetsinYemen.pdf>.
Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frequency
In 2012, the Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey was designed as a tool to regularly monitor living conditions and information on how poor and vulnerable populations are coping in Yemen, to produce evidence on the impact of the SWF cash transfer programme and inform improvements in future social protection efforts and programme targeting; impact estimates were generated by the IPC-IG. MIS: SWF monitoring and information system
References
IPC-IG and UNICEF. 2014. Yemen National Social Protection Monitoring Survey (NSPMS): 2012-2013. Brasília: United Nations Children’s Fund, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth, Interaction in Development, and Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation of Yemen. Accessed 28 July 2017. <http://www.ipc-undp. org/pub/eng/Yemen_National_Social_Protection_Monitoring_Survey_2012_2013.pdf>.