Programme objectives

To reduce hunger and malnutrition among school children, and increase school enrolment, attendance and retention.

References
Yunusa, I. et al. 2012. “School Feeding Program in Nigeria: a Vehicle for Nourishment of Pupils.” The African Symposium: An online journal of the African Educational Research Network, Vol. 12, No. 2. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ncsu.edu/aern/TAS12.2/ TAS12.2Yunusa.pdf>.
Country
Geographic area
Previous programme name (if any)
 
Start date
2005
References
Yunusa, I. et al. 2012. “School Feeding Program in Nigeria: a Vehicle for Nourishment of Pupils.” The African Symposium: An online journal of the African Educational Research Network, Vol. 12, No. 2. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ncsu.edu/aern/TAS12.2/ TAS12.2Yunusa.pdf>.
Programme components
The programme also includes procurement of food from smallholder farmers as a component.
References
Yunusa, I. et al. 2012. “School Feeding Program in Nigeria: a Vehicle for Nourishment of Pupils.” The African Symposium: An online journal of the African Educational Research Network, Vol. 12, No. 2. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ncsu.edu/aern/TAS12.2/ TAS12.2Yunusa.pdf>.
Conditionalities (if any)
School attendance
Contribution type and amount
 
Targeting methods
Categorical Targeting
Geographical Targeting
References
World Food Programme. 2013. State of School Feeding Worldwide. Rome: WFP. Accessed 11 November 2015. <https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/13536/WFP_ StateofSchoolFeeding2013_web.pdf?sequence=1>.
Targeted areas
The pilot phase comprised 12 states in the six geopolitical zones: Bauchi, Edo, Enugu, Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Imo, Kano, Kogi, Nassarawa, Niger, Ogun, Yobe and Osun States.
References
. Yunusa, I. et al. 2012. “School Feeding Program in Nigeria: a Vehicle for Nourishment of Pupils.” The African Symposium: An online journal of the African Educational Research Network, Vol. 12, No. 2. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ncsu.edu/aern/TAS12.2/ TAS12.2Yunusa.pdf>.
Target groups
Children
Eligibility criteria
School enrolment
Eligibility reassessment (if any)
 
Type of benefits
Food
Amount of benefits
The food is usually delivered in the form of a hot meal at lunch, which is designed to be balanced and to contain one third of the Recommended Dietary Allowance of nutrients. In Osun, a beverage (of milk, sugar and cocoa) is also served as a complement.
References
Global Child Nutrition Foundation. 2009. Country Policy and Funding Mechanism Study. Seattle, WA: GCNF. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://hgsf-global.org/en/bank/downloads/doc_details/25-countrypolicy- and-funding-mechanism-study>.
Payment/delivery frequency
Daily
References
Federal Ministry of Education of Nigeria. 2006. Implementation Guidelines on National School Health Programme. Abuja: Federal Ministry of Education of Nigeria. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.unicef.org/nigeria/NG_resources_implementationschoolhealthprog.pdf>.
Benefit delivery mechanism
Feeding takes place in dining rooms/halls at schools, where the meals are served under the supervision of teachers.
References
Federal Ministry of Education of Nigeria. 2006. Implementation Guidelines on National School Health Programme. Abuja: Federal Ministry of Education of Nigeria. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.unicef.org/nigeria/NG_resources_implementationschoolhealthprog.pdf>.
Benefit recipients
Students
Minimum and maximum duration of benefits (if any)
 
Coverage
155,000 beneficiaries, or 1 per cent of children attending school.
References
World Food Programme. 2013. State of School Feeding Worldwide. Rome: WFP. Accessed 11 November 2015. <https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/13536/WFP_ StateofSchoolFeeding2013_web.pdf?sequence=1>.
Programme expenditure
NGN2.9 billion has been spent on feeding, deworming, equipment and materials up to 2010.
References
Yunusa, I. et al. 2012. “School Feeding Program in Nigeria: a Vehicle for Nourishment of Pupils.” The African Symposium: An online journal of the African Educational Research Network, Vol. 12, No. 2. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ncsu.edu/aern/TAS12.2/ TAS12.2Yunusa.pdf>.
Institutions and agencies involved
The Federal Government of Nigeria; New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD); World Food Programme (WFP); UNICEF
References
Yunusa, I. et al. 2012. “School Feeding Program in Nigeria: a Vehicle for Nourishment of Pupils.” The African Symposium: An online journal of the African Educational Research Network, Vol. 12, No. 2. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ncsu.edu/aern/TAS12.2/ TAS12.2Yunusa.pdf>.
Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frequency
Inspection and monitoring is to be done using standardised checklists and schedules. This falls under the responsibilities of the monitoring and evaluation committees and other relevant agencies at all levels and led by the Inspectorate.
References
Federal Ministry of Education of Nigeria. 2006. Implementation Guidelines on National School Health Programme. Abuja: Federal Ministry of Education of Nigeria. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.unicef.org/nigeria/NG_resources_implementationschoolhealthprog.pdf>.