Programme objectives

To strengthen the capacity of poor people to care for and protect orphans
and vulnerable children (OVC); encourage the fostering and retention of
OVC within their families and communities; and promote the development
of human capital of OVC.

References
Ministry of Labour, Social Security and Services. n.d. Achievements under the Jubilee Government, Ministry of Labour, Social Security and Services. Nairobi: Government of Kenya. Accessed 29 February 2016. <http://www.labour.go.ke/downloads/MOLSSS%20AchievemntsF.pdf>.
Country
Geographic area
Previous programme name (if any)
 
Start date
2004
References
The pilot started in 2004 and was formally approved by the Cabinet in 2007.
Programme components
Conditionalities (if any)
Beneficiary households should provide for the care and protection of OVC: primary school attendance of all eligible children and attendance of younger children at health centres for immunisations and other health interventions
References
Bryant, J.H. 2009. “Kenya’s cash transfer program: protecting the health and human rights of orphans and vulnerable children.” Health and Human Rights, Vol. 11, No. 2: 65–76. 3. National Gender and Equality Commission. 2014. Participation of Vulnerable Populations in their Own Programmes - The Cash Transfers in Kenya. Nairobi: National Gender and Equality Commission.
Contribution type and amount
 
Targeting methods
Proxy Means Test
Categorical Targeting
Geographical Targeting
Community-Based Targeting
Targeted areas
 
Target groups
OVC, persons living with HIV/AIDS, people who are severely ill and people with disabilities.
Eligibility criteria
Poor households with at least one OVC aged 0–17 years with at least one deceased parent, or whose parent or main caregiver is chronically ill or has a severe disability.
Eligibility reassessment (if any)
 
Type of benefits
Fixed cash transfers
Amount of benefits
KES2,000 (around USD21) per month
Payment/delivery frequency
Bi-monthly
Benefit delivery mechanism
The benefits are delivered either through the post office (Postal Corporation of Kenya—PCK) or via the Equity Bank.
References
National Gender and Equality Commission. 2014. Participation of Vulnerable Populations in their Own Programmes - The Cash Transfers in Kenya. Nairobi: National Gender and Equality Commission. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ngeckenya.org/Downloads/cash-transfer-programme-vulnerablegroups- kenya.pdf>.
Benefit recipients
Caregiver
Minimum and maximum duration of benefits (if any)
 
Coverage
The programme reaches around 260,000 households. The coverage is expected to rise to 360,000 households in 2016.
References
Economic & Social Rights Centre – Hakijamii. 2014. State of Social Protection in Kenya. Nairobi: Hakijamii. Accessed 29 February 2016. <http://www.hakijamii.com/images/SocialP/SSP.pdf>.
Programme expenditure
USD26 million (0.08 per cent of GDP) (fiscal year 2010)
References
National Gender and Equality Commission. 2014. Participation of Vulnerable Populations in their Own Programmes - The Cash Transfers in Kenya. Nairobi: National Gender and Equality Commission. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.ngeckenya.org/Downloads/cash-transfer-programme-vulnerablegroups- kenya.pdf>.
Institutions and agencies involved
Government of Kenya; UNICEF; UK Department for International Development (DFID); Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA); International Development Association (IDA)
References
World Bank. 2013. “Kenya Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (CT-OVC) Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/ NEWS/0,,contentMDK:22887829~menuPK:141311~pagePK:34370~piPK:34424~theSitePK:4607,00.html>.
Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frequency
Constituency Social Assistance Committees (CSAC) and Location OVC Committees (LOC) monitor programme performance at the local level to ascertain receipt of benefits and household compliance with conditionalities.
References
Bryant, J.H. 2009. “Kenya’s cash transfer program: protecting the health and human rights of orphans and vulnerable children.” Health and Human Rights, Vol. 11, No. 2: 65–76.