Programme objectives

To address food insecurity by providing poor households with access to cash transfers and public work opportunities.

References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>. Government of Niger. 2011. “Presentation sur le projet des filets sociaux au Niger.” CaLP website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.cashlearning.org/resources/library/233-presentation-sur-leprojet- des-filets-sociaux-au-niger>.
Country
Geographic area
Previous programme name (if any)
 
Start date
2011
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>. Government of Niger. 2011. “Presentation sur le projet des filets sociaux au Niger.” CaLP website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.cashlearning.org/resources/library/233-presentation-sur-leprojet- des-filets-sociaux-au-niger>.
Programme components
Cash transfers for food security and cash for work.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>. Government of Niger. 2011. “Presentation sur le projet des filets sociaux au Niger.” CaLP website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.cashlearning.org/resources/library/233-presentation-sur-leprojet- des-filets-sociaux-au-niger>.
Conditionalities (if any)
Though the cash transfers are unconditional, a ‘soft condition’ related to the beneficiaries’ health and nutritional practices is imposed via the promotion of complementary educational activities within the community.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Contribution type and amount
 
Targeting methods
Proxy Means Test
Categorical Targeting
Geographical Targeting
Community-Based Targeting
Self-Targeting
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Targeted areas
Dosso, Maradi, Tahoua, Tillaberi and Zinder regions
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Target groups
The poorest and most food-insecure households.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Eligibility criteria
Cash transfers for food security: The poorest and most food-insecure households were registered as beneficiaries of the programme within the targeted regions. They were identified using data from the 2007 National Survey on Household Income and Consumption in Niger. The proxy means-testing process also includes a questionnaire to verify the household’s characteristics, including its housing conditions and ownership of assets. Cash for work: While the cash transfers component targets households in a situation of chronic food insecurity, the cash-for-work component is aimed at groups of beneficiaries who are in a situation of temporary and unusual food insecurity. It, therefore, employs a self-targeting method, conducted on a first-come, first-served basis. If the demand for employment exceeds the project’s capacity, additional categorical targeting criteria may apply to include the maximum number of vulnerable households.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Eligibility reassessment (if any)
 
Type of benefits
Cash
Amount of benefits
Cash transfers for food security: monthly transfer of XOF10,000 (USD20) Cash for work: daily wage of XOF1,000, which is the legal minimum wage for unskilled labour in rural areas. This wage level is expected to be conducive to the self-targeting strategy of the component.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Payment/delivery frequency
Cash transfers for food security: monthly. Cash for work: twice a month.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Benefit delivery mechanism
Microfinance institutions and mobile phone companies.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Benefit recipients
Cash transfers for food security: women as representatives of their households. Cash for work: workers. Around 50 per cent of the beneficiaries of the whole project are women.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Minimum and maximum duration of benefits (if any)
Cash transfers for food security: The programme is expected to last for two cycles of 24 months (villages targeted during the first cycle will not be eligible for the second cycle). Cash for work: 60 days of work for each beneficiary.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Coverage
Cash transfers for food security: a total of 80,000 beneficiaries were expected to be reached by the project’s end. Currently, 44,888 households have benefited from the transfers. Exceptionally, in 2012, an additional 2,500 households (Nigeriens fleeing insecurity in Libya) benefitted from the cash transfers for a period of 12 months. Cash for work: 15,000 beneficiaries per year (60,000 by the end of the project) were expected to be reached; currently, 41,100 beneficiaries have been reached.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.
Programme expenditure
The World Bank financing for the cash transfers for food security component amounts to USD48.6 million—which comprises the total costs including contingencies—and the financing for the cash for work component amounts to USD10.5 million.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>. Government of Niger. 2011. “Presentation sur le projet des filets sociaux au Niger.” CaLP website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.cashlearning.org/resources/library/233-presentation-sur-leprojet- des-filets-sociaux-au-niger>.
Institutions and agencies involved
Government of Niger; World Bank; UNICEF
References
Government of Niger. 2011. “Presentation sur le projet des filets sociaux au Niger.” CaLP website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.cashlearning.org/resources/library/233-presentation-sur-leprojet-
Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frequency
The monitoring and evaluation system will rely on a database managed by a management information system (MIS). The Technical Management Unit (Unité de gestion technique—UGT) is responsible for producing quarterly reports on the project’s performance and progress.
References
World Bank. 2015. “Niger Safety Net Project.” World Bank website. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/projects/P123399/niger-safety-net-project?lang=en>.