Cash for work

Cash for Work programmes consist of “cash transfers distributed to vulnerable individuals or households in exchange for labour.” Barrientos, A. et al (2010). ‘Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database’, Chronic Poverty Research Centre (accessed 16 June 2015).

Cash transfers

“Cash transfers are direct, regular and predictable non-contributory cash payments that help poor and vulnerable households to raise and smooth incomes. The term encompasses a range of instruments (e.g. social pensions, child grants or public works programmes) and a spectrum of design, implementation and financing options.” See also: Social Assistance Arnold, C. et al (2011). ‘DFID Cash Transfers Literature Review’, DFID (accessed 16 June 2015).

Categorical Targeting (Targeting Method)

“Categorical targeting consists in selecting individuals belonging to a certain category of people using observable characteristics that do not require the collection of a large amount of data.” Cirillo, C., Györi, M., Veras Soares, F. (2015, forthcoming). ‘Targeting Social Protection and Agricultural Interventions – The potential for synergies’, IPC-IG Working Paper, forthcoming July 2015.

Community-Based Targeting (Targeting Method)

“Community-based targeting selects eligible households by the assessment of a selected team of community members and leaders.” Cirillo, C., Györi, M., Veras Soares, F. (2015, forthcoming). ‘Targeting Social Protection and Agricultural Interventions – The potential for synergies’, IPC-IG Working Paper, forthcoming July 2015.

Conditional cash transfers

Conditional cash transfers (CCTs) refer to “cash distributed to individuals or households on condition that these undertake specified activities, e.g. that children attend school or that mothers attend primary health centres.” Barrientos, A. et al (2010). ‘Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database’, Chronic Poverty Research Centre (accessed 16 June 2015).

Conditional in-kind transfers

“Conditional in-kind transfers (CITs) provide in-kind benefits to participants upon their fulfillment of conditions (…). Typical examples include school feeding programs that provide on-site meals to children in schools”. (In the example of school-feeding programmes, the implicit conditionality to receive the benefit is school attendance.) World Bank & International Monetary Fund (2015). ‘Global Monitoring Report 2014/2015: Ending Poverty and Sharing Prosperity’, World Bank (accessed 16...

Conditionalities

“In the context of social welfare, the term conditionality refers to (…) households or individuals who receive government transfers conditional on some form of behavioral compliance. This means that in order to continue receiving support qualifying households have to meet specific conditions that are spelled out by the program. (…) [C]onditionality is supposed to tackle behavioral barriers that prevent households to improve their situation and escape poverty.” Schüring, E. (2010). ‘Conditions,...

Contributory Health Insurance

Contributory Health Insurance comprises employment-related schemes which provide health insurance to employees based on contributions (from employers and/or employees).

Coverage

In the context of social protection, coverage refers to “the population reached by a programme. Coverage rate measures the extent to which programmes reach their target population.” Barrientos, A. et al (2010). ‘Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database’, Chronic Poverty Research Centre (accessed 16 June 2015).